What the art direction in season 2 of “Sex Education” tells you about millennials and their sexual freedom

Dear readers,

The British Netflix show “Sex Education” has blessed its fans with a second season, continuing with the love stories of Otis, Eric, Maeve and their friends. “Sex Education” is not only about love, romanticism, or sex, as the title of the show would imply. Sure, there’s tons of sex. This is a show more about how communication works and effects our personalities. The education is focused on sex, but the students in the show learn way more than that.

Season 2 has definitely set the bar higher. The first season was more lovey-dovey, where the characters were getting to known each other and themselves. For the first time ever they were entering in the world of adolescence, so each character’s narrative was being built up depending on their specific backgrounds. Otis, the protagonist, was dealing with being a sensitive late bloomer. Eric was coming out as a homosexual, Maeve came off her rough shelter, Jackson fell in love with Maeve, Lily was getting comfortable in her quirkiness, Aimee was being less childish. In season two everything stays the same, but there’s a deep change in how the stories are told. This happened because the characters grew up. Not only their body changed altogether, but their mind made a great step toward adulthood.

Still being turbulent and emotional teenagers, the guys and girls in “Sex Education” are depicted with vivid colors and a diverse style. Ola, whose character is way more explored in this season, given her relationship with Otis and then Lily, wears vintage-look and gender-fluid clothes, which give her a tone of indie and alternative. Since Ola is into cinematography and feminism, this attire of her is almost expected, but very much aesthetically welcomed. Maeve has a basic and minimal wardrobe, but it perfectly her personality: she’s very deep in her actions and intentions, and the total opposite of a superficial person.

View this post on Instagram

♥️17/01/2020♥️

A post shared by Emma Mackey (@emmatmackey) on

Aimee was the one the most caught my attention, whose story was the most touching one among the other powerful ones. She finally grew up. She’s still dumb. But her awful episode of sexual assault woke her up. In this season Aimee dresses differently: she maintains her girlie style, but before and after the sexual assault her stylistic choices are different due to the nature of the trauma she lives throughout the episodes. Her story was the one I appreciated most, because unfortunately this type of sexual assaults, where men feel the right to touch their genitalia and do what they please by looking at women especially in a closed public space, are too often the reality in this world. Eric is always eclectic, he honestly didn’t surprise me much. Otis seems to have stuck up to his preppy-little boy style, even though at the very end of the season he looks like to have entered in his journey to manhood.

I’m looking forward to season 3. I hope there will be another one. There are a couple of details that of course need to be developed, so I’m pretty sure the writers will come up with new stories and new sex tips and facts to share. I was glad to notice a step forward towards the fashion and artistic directions taken in this season. They looked precise and subtle, powerful enough to give a message and maintain the light in many somber situations the characters were involved into.

I enjoy watching “Sex Education” because their writers are blunt and at the same time clever enough to treat such a delicate and intimate subject like sex with a young audience of viewers. I wish I had a qualified sex education course in my high school. Not only for me, but mostly for my high school mates, because most of them didn’t have the possibilities to get to know their bodies in the right ways or engage safely in sexual activities. What I also like about this tv show is that the stories inside it normalize sex. The characters do and talk about sex and love in a very rough and honest way, while learning about life. They get heartbroken by friendships, romantic relationships, family members, society: the show is set in a school, but what these kids mostly get is a street education, the one that slaps you in face, hits your heart, and strengthen your brain.

I felt empowered while watching this show because it makes me think on different levels how the act of sex can open many discussions, can be so vulnerable for the heart and the psyche, and be a tool of independence: I strongly believe that sex should be a choice, a big one to be done safely and with the right knowledge. That is why I think this show is successful and really educative.

Next post will be about one of my favourite tv shows ever: that one is really about LIFE.

Beijos,

the curly flower

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s